Physician dating former patient

Hahnemann continued practicing and researching homeopathy, as well as writing and lecturing for the rest of his life.

He died in 1843 in Paris, at 88 years of age, and is entombed in a mausoleum at Paris's Père Lachaise Cemetery.

Noting that the drug induced malaria-like symptoms in himself, he concluded that it would do so in any healthy individual.

This led him to postulate a healing principle: "that which can produce a set of symptoms in a healthy individual, can treat a sick individual who is manifesting a similar set of symptoms." This principle, like cures like, became the basis for an approach to medicine which he gave the name homeopathy.

He served as a Major in the British Army during World War II, and then had a career in the city of London.

He was at one point appointed as a Freeman of the City of London.

His more systematic experiments with dose reduction really commenced around 1800-01 when, on the basis of his "law of similars," he had begun using Ipecacuanha for the treatment of coughs and Belladonna for scarlet fever.

He first published an article about the homeopathic approach in a German-language medical journal in 1796.

After one term of further study, he graduated MD at the University of Erlangen on 10 August 1779, qualifying with honors.

His poverty may have forced him to choose Erlangen, as the school's fees were lower.

He first used the term homeopathy in his essay Indications of the Homeopathic Employment of Medicines in Ordinary Practice, published in Hufeland's Journal in 1807.

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